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Battle Pack: Battle of Britain Spitfire and Messerschmitt BF-109

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£44.99
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Wingspan:
18" (460mm)

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Description

At a Glance

BATTLE PACK SET

This double kit pack is a great way to get started with the hobby or to expand your collection. The pack contains an individual Spitfire and individual BF 109 kit, each containing glue, printed instruction booklets and all the materials you need. It's simply two kits put together at a slight discount from buying them individually. This way you get double the fun for less.

SPITFIRE

  • Power System - Rubber Free Flight
  • Wingspan - 18" (460mm)
  • Approximate AUW - 25g
  • Difficulty - Beginner

MESSERSCHMITT BF-109

  • Power System - Rubber Free Flight
  • Wingspan - 18" (460mm)
  • Approximate AUW - 25g
  • Difficulty - Beginner

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE - THE ONE AND ONLY

The Spitfire was designed by Reginald Mitchell of The Supermarine Aviation Works and is arguably the most elegant but deadly aircraft of World War 2. The beautiful fuselage curves, the distinctive elliptical wings, plus its legendary service in action, make it one of the most recognisable and loved aircraft in the world. The prototype first flew from Eastleigh Aerodrome, near Southampton, England in March 1936.

The Spitfire was an advanced aircraft when first designed and unlike its similarly Merlin-engined stablemate the Hawker Hurricane, used new complicated monocoque construction techniques. As a result of these complexities and production difficulties at Supermarine, the move from prototype to full production was slow and problematic. However, once this was overcome, the Spitfire was produced in huge numbers. This is in part due to the more advanced initial design, which was able to be constantly developed and improved to increase performance, ironically the very thing that hindered it in the early days.

Production only ceased in 1948, making it the only allied aircraft to be manufactured for the entirety of the war.

THE MESSERSCHMITT BF109 - A MENACING MACHINE

The Messerschmitt BF109 (often called the ME109) was designed by Willy Messerschmitt and Robert Lusser of Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (BFW) - later to become Messerschmitt AG. The aircraft first flew in 1935 ironically powered by a Rolls Royce Kestrel engine as the intended Jumo engine was not ready. It was designed specifically to take part in a Luftwaffe competition to select a new fighter aircraft as Germany rearmed in contravention of the treaty of Versailles.

Technically advanced, it won the competition by some margin; it would take Focke Wulf, one of the rival companies, until 1941 to catch up and arguably surpass the ME109 with the Focke Wulf 190. The all metal monocoque design had many innovative features including two large magnesium alloy forgings that held the engine and the undercarriage, meaning that the lightly constructed wings did not have to carry landing loads and could easily be removed for transport or repair. This feature, although efficient, left the undercarriage with a distinctive narrow “splayed” track, resulting in poor stability whilst landing and taxiing, killing or injuring many German pilots.

The ME109 was continually developed during the entirety of the war with nearly 34,000 built, more than any other fighter in history.

YOUR KIT

This kit is designed for you to build a traditionally constructed, rubber powered, free flight model of a Spitfire. The kit includes the materials (other than paints) to complete a spitfire with plain white covering, so you can decide to do your own favourite scheme.

Construction of the model from this kit uses the traditional method of "stick and tissue", that consists of a built up balsa wood skeleton (framework), covered with a tissue skin. The balsa frameworks are built over a plan that is printed at the exact scale of the model, which is in essence a real engineering drawing. Power is provided by rubber strip motor that is wound up before flight.

Free flight means just that - once the model is launched, it is on its own. It must follow a predetermined flight path established when the model is initially adjusted for flight or "trimmed". This type of traditional building technique and flying requires a degree of patience and skill, but is extremely rewarding. Typically for a small model and in the spirit of the traditional kits, profiles are simplified and adjusted from the original and a relatively large propeller is used. This is done so that the model is light and stable enough to fly on its own, is simple in construction and can work with the rubber motor. These adjustments have been done with care and sensitivity so that the shape and spirit of the original aircraft is preserved as much as possible.

Also in the spirit of the traditional kits, additional items required to build the model are things that can be found in the kitchen drawer or are easily available on the high street.

KIT CONTENTS

Three balsa sheets with precise laser cut parts and strip wood.
PVA glue for building the wooden frames.
One 150mm diameter plastic propeller.
One pre-bent motor hook and shaft.
Three low friction plastic nose bushings - one for the propeller and two for the undercarriage wheels.
One vacuum formed canopy and spinner.
Piano wire for the main undercarriage and tail wheel legs.
One motor peg (cocktail stick or toothpick).
Rubber motor strip.
Tissue to cover the model.
Parts reference sheet (W), full size summary plan sheet (X), scheme diagram sheet (Y) and scheme markings (Z) printed on lightweight paper.

Additional Resources

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MARKINGS SHEET

Click the link below to download a pdf version of the markings sheet included in the Spitfire kit.

The markings sheet should fit onto a single A4 page and may be printed onto your own paper or decal transfer sheet.

Download the markings sheet here:

SPITFIRE PATTERNS SHEET

Click the link below to download a pdf version of the patterns for acetate and paper/card parts originally drawn on the plan.

This will save you from having to cut into your beautiful plan!

Download the patterns sheet

VIDEO BUILD

Built, filmed, edited and produced by the amazing Rob Brennan

ILLUSTRATED BUILD

The illustrated instructions below are available for you to view, download or print out for free.

They do not replace the instruction book but can be used alongside it.

We hope you find them useful!

MAIN PARTS & FRAMES BUILDING SCHEDULE

The Centre Section [Download]

The Main Wing Panels [Download]

Completing the Wings [Download]

The Tail Plane (Stabiliser) [Download]

The Fin & Rudder [Download]

The Fuselage [Download]

The Nose Block [Download]

Finishing the Fuselage [Download]

The Wheels, Undercarriage & Spinner [Download]

Radiator, Oil Cooler, Exhausts, Air Inlet & Fillet Pieces [Download]

COVERING

The Fin, Rudder & Tail Plane [Download]

The Wings [Download]

The Fuselage [Download]

FINAL ASSEMBLY

[Download]

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Returns Policy
If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase, simply return the item to us in its original condition within 14 days of receipt.

Returned items should be unused and must be returned in original packaging with any enclosed documentation. The item is your responsibility until it reaches us and the cost of returning the item to us is your responsibility too. Therefore, for your own protection, we recommend that you send the parcel using a delivery service that insures you for the value of the goods. Delivery charges are only refundable where goods are faulty and a refund is made.